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John Armleder (Swiss, b.1948)
Baronial
2016
Rubber stamp print
Variant edition of 60
Signed, dated, titled and numbered in pencil
Sheet: 9 1/2 x 9 1/2 inches (24.13 x 24.13 cm)
$400

Executed in New York in May of 2016, the present work is a variant edition with each work being unique in the placement and density of the red dot.
 
Rubber stamp print printed with Warm Red Van Son Rubber Based Letterpress ink, a fine, fresh impression, the full sheet, printed on smooth white 335gsm Coventry Rag, hand-signed, dated, titled and numbered in pencil on the reverse, executed in a variant edition of 60 examples (there were also X numbered and annotated Artist's Proofs, 10 numbered and annotated HC proofs, 2 numbered and annotated Printer's Proofs, 1 annotated proof for the archives of the Cabinet d'arts graphiques, Geneva and 1 annotated BAT proof), printed by the artist with the assistance of Brad Ewing at The Grenfell Press, New York, published by World House Editions, Middlebury, Connecticut, in fine condition, unframed.

Literature:

Tallman, Susan.  "Dot Dot Dot," article in Art in Print, Volume 6, Number 6, March-April 2017, pp.26-27, illustrated p.27 (another example).
 
Staff.  "News of the Print World: Selected New Editions", article in Art in Print, volume 6, number 2, July-August 2016, p.53 (another example).

Notes:

The size of the image is 3 1/2 inches (8.89 cm) in diameter.
 
A portion of the proceeds from the sale of this print will go to benefit the Center for Contemporary Printmaking in Norwalk, Connecticut.
 
John Armleder has been using the dot motif since the late 1970s and they can be found in the artist’s paintings, drawings, prints and even multiple objects.  Clearly paying homage to such avant-garde artists as Francis Picabia, Alexander Rodchenko, Larry Poons and even Tom Downing, John Armleder, through his notion of appropriation, has raised the simple, optical concept and arrangement of dots from a pure mode of abstract pictorial composition to a systematic concept of representation and perhaps even structural analysis.